Wickham Park Marathon Home Page

Wickham Park Marathon

and 50, 100, and 200 Mile Fun Runs

The race is Sun. May 25, 2014, 7:30 AM at Wickham Park, Melbourne FL. Warning: Read the entry form first.

Schedule of events

Sat. May 24

Group course marking (3.75 mile walk) sometime around 9 or 10 or 11 AM.

Sun. May 25

  • 7:00 AM - Wickham Park opens (south entrance)
  • 7:30 AM - Race starts
  • 8:00 PM - Cutoff for marathon and 50 miles, park closes

Mon. May 26

  • 7:00 AM - Park opens
  • 7:30 AM - Second 50 mile stage begins
  • 8:00 PM - 100 mile cutoff, park closes

Tue-Wed. May 27-28

Stages 3 and 4 of the 200 mile run, 7:30 AM to 8:00 PM.

Course map (Google)
Race instructions and map of course

Past results

If you are looking for me, my picture is on my home page.

Interesting Facts About Florida Wildlife

Alligators grow throughout their lifetime, reaching up to 12 feet in length. Their jaws clamp shut with 3000 pounds of force. They kill their victims by carrying them underwater until they drown. Once endangered, Florida now has millions of alligators, enough that the fall hunting season was recently expanded. During their mating season (late March through early June), the males wander from their watery habitat in search of mates, and can turn up anywhere. WARNING: Do not swallow a live alligator.

There are four kinds of poisonous snakes in the U.S., rattlesnakes (above), water moccasins, copperheads, and coral snakes. Florida is the only state that has all four. All of these snakes except the coral snake are pit vipers, and can be identified by the pupils of their eyes, which are slitted like a cat's eye, rather than round like a human. Their venom is a hemotoxin which dissolves blood vessels causing their victims to bleed to death internally.

Unlike pit vipers, the venom of the coral snake is a neurotoxin which kills by paralyzing its victims. Its bite is almost painless, compared to the extremely painful bite of a rattlesnake, yet its venom is also the deadliest.

Coral snakes are often confused with the non-poisonous king snake, which is also red, yellow, and black, but with the colors in a different order. There is a saying to help you distinguish them, red on yellow, kill a fella. The easier way to remember, however, is that there are no king snakes in the area.

-- Matt Mahoney, mattmahoneyfl at gmail dot com